WHILE the new Spider-Man film is better at portraying adolescent angst than super-powered heroics, the videogame tie-in suffers no such shortcomings.

The Amazing Spider-Man

Publisher: Activision

Price: £49.99

Format: PS3 (also on Xbox 360, PC, Wii, 3DS, DS)

Age rating: 16+

WHILE the new Spider-Man film is better at portraying adolescent angst than super-powered heroics, the videogame tie-in suffers no such shortcomings. The Amazing Spider-Man: The Game is a non-stop assault on the senses, as everyone’s favourite wise-cracking web-spinner swings from one end of New York City to the other in a free-roaming adventure full of acrobatic fisticuffs and stealthy takedowns.

Set in the immediate aftermath of the movie, we’re wary of giving too many plot points away, in case you’ve yet to see Spidey’s latest big screen outing. Suffice to say, Manhattan is in dire straits, a number of cross-species monstrosities are terrorizing its inhabitants, an army of killer robots are on the loose and a deadly virus is sweeping the city.

Of course, none of that matters once you’re let loose in the concrete jungle, as you’ll be too busy marvelling at your airborne athleticism. It really is a blast to hold down a trigger button and watch Spider-Man shoot out webbing from his wrists and swing into action.

If cracking heads together is more your thing, the game’s combat elements are pretty solid. You can bash away on the attack button before launching into a well-timed takedown or, if you’re spider sense is tingling, press the dodge button to roll out of harm’s way. Alternatively, if you favour a stealthy approach, you can attack from the shadows, dropping down on an opponent from the ceiling and encasing them in webbing.

Don’t expect to be battling a Who’s Who of Spider-Man’s most famous adversaries, as the roster is fairly limited. Recognizable foes include Rhino, Scorpion and The Lizard, but you’ll spend an equal amount of time trading punches with lesser-known villains such as Vermin and Iguana. Sitting alongside regular missions are a bunch of additional tasks, including participating in races, rescuing infected citizens, clobbering petty criminals and collecting hundreds of comic book pages.

Although it’s disappointing that there are no co-op or multiplayer modes, the single-player campaign clocks in at a respectable 15+ hours. It’s been 50 years since Spider-Man first graced the pages of Amazing Fantasy 15, and it’s great to find the web-spinner in such fine form. In short, this is the best Spider-Man game in years.