A BLOCKBUSTER in every sense of the word, LEGO Batman 2 lets you step into the plastic boots of the Caped Crusader and Robin, as you smash bricks, collect studs, solve puzzles and battle some of DC’s most infamous evildoers.

LEGO Batman 2: DC Super Heroes

Publisher: Warner Bros.

Price: £39.99

Format: Xbox 360 (also on PS3, PC, Wii, PS Vita, DS, 3DS)

Age rating: 7+

A BLOCKBUSTER in every sense of the word, LEGO Batman 2 lets you step into the plastic boots of the Caped Crusader and Robin, as you smash bricks, collect studs, solve puzzles and battle some of DC’s most infamous evildoers. Set in an open world Gotham City, and spread across 15 story-based missions, this is the most expansive LEGO game yet, laced with tongue-in-cheek humour and a host of collectibles.

The game begins with the Joker gatecrashing Gotham’s ‘Man of the Year’ awards, with the likes of Two-Face, the Riddler and Harley Quinn helping him relieve the audience of their valuables. Naturally enough, Batman and Robin dutifully intervene, using a variety of gadgets and power-enhancing suits in order to gain the upper-hand. The formulaic fisticuffs is pretty much as you’d expect, but rather than mumbling their way through a fight, your LEGO-based charges have been blessed with the power of speech for the first time. It’s a small change, but imaginatively enacted, with the voiceover work crackling with witty one-liners.

Despite the game’s subtitle, Superman is the only other superhero that gets a decent amount of screen time, with the likes of Wonder Woman, Green Lantern and The Flash relegated to the last couple of missions. The Man of Brick is a brilliant addition, although his considerable powers are kept in check by the fact that he’s vulnerable to Kryptonite, amongst other things.

As a single-player experience, LEGO Batman 2 is enjoyable enough, but really comes alive when a local co-op buddy joins in the fun. Teamwork is crucial to solving some of the game’s puzzles, but the dynamic split-screen that changes shape depending on how near or how far you are to each other’s location is a little disorientating. Couple this with a general lack of signposting, and we’re sure some children will find navigation a bit of a problem.

Once you’ve finished the main campaign, there’s the whole of Gotham City to explore. Whether you’re collecting golden bricks, battling villains, solving puzzles, unlocking mini-kit parts or driving the Batmobile, you’ll never be stuck for things to do. It also helps that there’s a coherent storyline this time around, too, providing the perfect brick-laden tribute to one of pop culture’s most enduring characters.