FRESH from claiming pommel horse silver at the World Championships, Huntingdon gymnast Louis Smith is confident he can go one better at the London Olympics.

FRESH from claiming pommel horse silver at the World Championships, Huntingdon gymnast Louis Smith is confident he can go one better at the London Olympics.

The 21-year-old was again in sensational form in Rotterdam on Saturday, as he put last year’s bitter worlds disappointment – he fell from the apparatus – behind him by ­scoring 15.773 in the showpiece final.

Despite being pipped to the post for gold by his nemesis, Hungarian Krisztian Berki with 15.833, this latest success follows silver at the European Championships in ­Birmingham earlier this year.

And now Smith, who bagged bronze in Beijing in 2008, said he already had one eye on Olympic gold in two years.

He told The Hunts Post: “I know which routine I’m going to do in 2012. I’m still practising it now and it’s just choosing the time to do it.

“I’m confident that I’ve got the talent required and it’s now just about making sure it all comes together at the right time – and that’s 2012.”

Reflecting on his silver medal in Rotterdam, Smith said: “It was nice after what happened at the worlds in London last year.

“Also, being able to go into the event with the same routine – and being able to pull it off – was a huge relief.

“Going into the worlds last year I hadn’t completed that routine before, whereas this time I’d used it in a few competitions ­leading into it. I’m a lot more comfortable with it and it showed in my performance.”

While Smith backs his own ability, one man who also has faith in him is his coach, Paul Hall. He said: “When I was watching Louis I just wanted him to get through his routine cleanly.

“Having fallen in London last year, I think that was playing on his mind. It put him slightly on edge, but he’s come through that now. He wasn’t at his best in qualifying but once he reached the final he was more ­composed.”

Smith’s routine already has a high ­difficulty rating, made up of complicated techniques and manoeuvres to impress the judges.

But Hall said Smith would get even better.

“Louis has got a few more tenths to come,” he said. “Once you get to world level there are so many excellent exponents that you cannot make compromises.

“Louis has been concentrating on his ­routine since last year, and I’m confident that he is going to keep improving.

“The difference between gold and silver is just execution – how well you extend your toes or hold your form.”

Aside from his individual effort, Smith’s score of 15.800 on Thursday also helped Great Britain to claim seventh in the team event – a massive improvement on their 15th position in London last year.