Find out more about the history of Easton

St Peter's Church at Easton has a long and interesting history.

St Peter's Church at Easton has a long and interesting history. - Credit: HUTNTS POST

Easton lies approximately six miles west of Huntingdon between the villages of Ellington and Spaldwick, close to the A14.

The population is 169 people: made up of 83 males and 86 females across 65 households, according to the 2011 Census.

Over the years, the village has been known as Eston (11th Century) Estone (12th-16th Century) and Esson (16th Century).

Easton is recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086 as a settlement with 10 manors.

Easton is an ancient parish and until 1837, it was within the diocese of Lincoln, since then it has belonged to the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon, in the diocese of Ely. 

The parish was part of the St. Neots Poor Law Union from 1836-1930; the Rural Sanitary District from 1875-1894; Rural District from 1894-1974. 
In 1974 it became part of Huntingdonshire District Council.

The old water pump in Easton has been preserved.

The old water pump in Easton has been preserved. - Credit: HUNTS POST

The village has many fine examples of steeply gabled and dormered cottages with thatched or tiled roofs.

The village has a rich history and an active community.

The village has a rich history and an active community. - Credit: HUNTS POST

In 2010, a 13th Century bell pit was found in the floor. Further investigation showed the pit was used to burn charcoal in the process of melting metal in bell moulds.

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Church historian Beth Davis, who lives in the village, said: "A bell pit was constructed into the floor of the church tower and this is where the charcoal would have been burnt to be able to heat the whole of the mould for the casting of the bell.

“We found a lot of charcoal in the pit and some bell metal as well.”

The pit was found when the brick floor of the church tower was lifted.

Beth said: “The floor at the level of the pit was lime washed, so it perhaps never had a stone or brick covering until the 18th Century or later.”
The find sparked huge interest among historians who came to catch a glimpse before it was covered up.

“We had a lot of archaeologists visiting the site because a feature like this is usually destroyed and this one is so complete. It’s lovely.”
Despite the fact that there are only 66 houses the village, local people managed to raise thousands of pounds for the renovation work on the church.


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