There were some gruesome stories of life in Roman times at museum event

Sienna Sveinsson pictured with Roman soldier Neil Turner. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT

Sienna Sveinsson pictured with Roman soldier Neil Turner. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT - Credit: Archant

Visitors to St Neots Museum learned some gruesome details about life in Roman times during an event held earlier this month.

Kieran Sidlow, kids Emily-Jane, 7, brother Ryan, 6, and sister Charlotte Sharpe, 9 Picture: DUNCAN L

Kieran Sidlow, kids Emily-Jane, 7, brother Ryan, 6, and sister Charlotte Sharpe, 9 Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT - Credit: Archant

More than 300 people attended the Meet The Romans day at the museum, in New Street, on September 14.

Museum curator Liz Davies said: "It went really well and the re-enactors were able to answer everyone's questions about Roman soldiers lives and see the replica armour. The Roman doctor was able to amaze and terrify everyone with stories of Roman surgery and Roman medicine from trepanning (drilling into the skull to release pressure on the brain) to amputation making us all very grateful we are able to rely on the NHS."

There was also a religious expert who was able to explain the Roman gods and goddesses to visitors, including the way the Romans tried to link their deities to existing local cults that continued to be worshiped until Christianity gradually became the dominant religion during the Anglo-Saxon period. A Roman artist was able to explain how paints were made and how well off people employed artists to paint the walls of their houses, painted wall plaster has been found locally in the St Neots area.

Nicola Hubbard at St Neots Museum. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT

Nicola Hubbard at St Neots Museum. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT - Credit: Archant

Quynn Crompton in full Roman regalia. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT

Quynn Crompton in full Roman regalia. Picture: DUNCAN LAMONT - Credit: Archant


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