A SCULPTURE of a giant head has been unveiled in a school playing field in honour of one of St Neots most famous residents.

A SCULPTURE of a giant head has been unveiled in a school playing field in honour of one of St Neots most famous residents.

The statue has been inspired by the life of James Toller, the Eynesbury Giant, and was unveiled at Eynesbury C of E Primary School yesterday (Tuesday, October 5).

It was devised by sculptor David Swinton with help from pupils.

The sculpture will act as a focal point for an outside classroom. It is surrounded by benches and includes a giant storytelling chair. The huge sculpted face also has teeth for children to clean with toothbrushes and a head with planters from which ivy hair will grow.

Toller was born in 1798 in Rectory Lane, close to the school. He became a celebrity of his time and in 1815 appeared before the Emperor of Russia and the King of Prussia. In 1817 he posed for his portrait, which appeared in Kirby’s Wonderful Museum. He died in 1818 at a height of 8’ 1½”.

Luminus and Huntingdonshire District Council funded the £4,600 project through the Voice Your Choice scheme, which saw 30 community projects receive a share of £70,000.

Helen Rouse, headteacher, said: “The grant enabled use to think creatively about the development of an outdoor learning space for the children. Through linking local history with an imaginative giant character we hope to inspire our children’s learning and create something unique to the school.”

During the unveiling ceremony a collection of story books were donated by former pupils in memory of Harold Naylor, a past headteacher at the school.

Chan Abraham, Luminus Group Chief Executive, said: “Eynesbury C of E School have embraced the project and created a wonderful focal point for learning, enjoyment and community.

“We are delighted that, in partnership with Huntingdonshire District Council, we have been able to support such an inspirational project.”