Redevelopment set to ease pressure on Sawtry village schools

Artist's impression of Sawtry Junior and Infant School following a £5.7million redevelopment

Artist's impression of Sawtry Junior and Infant School following a £5.7million redevelopment - Credit: Archant

Sawtry Infants and Junior School could be set for a £5.7million redevelopment in a bid to deal with an increase in demand for primary places in the area.

Artist's impression of Sawtry Junior and Infant School following a £5.7million redevelopment

Artist's impression of Sawtry Junior and Infant School following a £5.7million redevelopment - Credit: Archant

Cambridgeshire County Council has put forward a proposal that would see places increase by half from 420 students to 630, and the addition of 60 pre-school spaces.

Councillor Simon Bywater, county council member for Sawtry, told The Hunts Post: “This is the right step forward in the right direction for the village.

“There is significant pressure on places and this development will alleviate some of that.”

“There are greater demands in the village because we have more houses – we have had 200 houses built recently and there are plans for more so there is the demand there for these places.


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In the plans, which will go before Huntingdonshire District Council and Sawtry Parish Council, the redevelopment will include six new classrooms, each with a capacity for 30 pupils, along with a new standalone building for the Buttons and Bows Pre-school.

It is also proposed to demolish an existing section of the infant school building and replace this with an extension containing the kitchen, servery and dining hall.

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Documents submitted by the county state: “It is viewed that the school extension on the site should be of suitable quality to lift the existing schools while providing an excellent learning environment and enhancing the school site management and security strategies.”

An initial consultation with draft plans was held at the school in May, in which dozens of residents and parents viewed the initial proposal.

Cllr Bywater, who attended the discussion, observed that the development would not result in residents living near the school being overlooked.

“Nothing is going to increase significantly for local residents, since the consultation nobody has made any remarks to me,” Cllr Bywater added.

If the application is given the go-ahead it is expected to welcome its first increased intake in September 2018 and will provide education from age ranges from two-years-old through to 11.

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