A householder is calling for action over traffic problems which have threatened homes during the historic statute fair in Kimbolton.

In the past three years three separate buildings have been damaged as the result of lorries failing to successfully negotiate the right angle bend between East Street and St Andrews Lane.In the past three years three separate buildings have been damaged as the result of lorries failing to successfully negotiate the right angle bend between East Street and St Andrews Lane.

Richard Giles wants to see temporary road signs put up during the fair - due to be held on September 16 - to divert lorries away from the village.

The fair, known as the Statty, is believed to date back to the 1200s when a prominent landowner was given a royal charter to hold a fair - but over the centuries is has turned into a funfair which occupies the whole of the High Street for a day.

Traffic is diverted along East Street and St Andrews Lane during the fair.

Mr Giles said three separate buildings, including a neighbour’s property, had been damaged in the past three years by lorries failing to negotiate a right-angle bend on the diversion.

“I love the fair and I would not want to change it,” he said. “Six lorries got stuck and I’m sure the drivers didn’t want to be in that position.”

Mr Giles said part of the problem was that none of the local councils had responsibility for the fair which meant it was difficult to find anyone to raise problems with.

“What we really want to do is to have a meeting with somebody, probably at the county council and in a senior position, to discuss taking action over the traffic,” he said.

Mr Giles felt that warning signs and diversions put in place on roads leading into the village during the fair would alleviate the problem.

Lionel Thatcher, clerk to Kimbolton and Stonely Parish Council, said discussions with the highways department were already taking place over putting signs warning of the village’s 18-tonne limit further out so drivers had advanced warning.

Mr Thatcher said there were few complaints about the fair, including from residents of the High Street, which the event filled.

He said the fair operated under an ancient statute which gave it the right to be held and was not the responsibility of the parish council.

He said there had been some minor damage caused by goods vehicles using the diversion along East Street and St Andrews Lane but felt this was mainly caused by heavy lorries breaking an 18-tonne limit.