A man died from multiple injuries after the lorry he was driving collided with three vehicles on the A14, an inquest heard.

Arthur Newall, 59, was killed on July 27 last year following the accident on the A14 eastbound at Alconbury.

An inquest held at Lawrence Court, Huntingdon, on Thursday (January 7) heard that Mr Newall may not have slowed down as he approached traffic, causing him to crash into other motorists.

The driver of the Volkswagen Golf that Mr Newall collided with, Mohammad Anjum, said: "I put my hazard lights on to warn that there was something in front of us was going on.

"I saw a white lorry behind me but it did not cause any concern at that point. But then it did not seem to be slowing down, and then the lorry hit into the back of me."

Mr Newall, of Emily Street, Keighley in Bradford, continued to collide with another lorry and a Vauxhall Corsa as his lorry skidded down the carriageway.

In a statement read out by senior coroner for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough David Heming, the driver of the Vauxhall Corsa Christopher Hebdon said: "I hadn't braced myself for impact, we were struck from behind with considerable force.

"Debris was flying around me it was quite scary - I could see a level of destruction on the carriageway."

Mr Hebdon suffered minor neck injuries while the other two drivers were uninjured.

A post mortem was carried out by Dr Martin Goddard, a pathologist from Papworth Hospital, which revealed Mr Newall died of multiple traumatic injuries sustained in the crash.

Collision investigator PC John Blood, from Cambridgeshire Police, who attended the scene, told the court: "Mr Newall failed to proceed and react to queuing traffic ahead of him. It is unknown to what extent Mr Newall was distracted by the collision on the opposite carriageway."

Mr Heming recorded a conclusion that Mr Newall died as the result of a road traffic accident, "on the A14 at Huntingdon from traumatic injuries when the Daff Box van that he was driving collided with the rear of a number of other vehicles".