Lego master builder Mike Addis has constructed models of a Shakespeare performance at the George Hotel, in Huntingdon, along with the town’s Cromwell Museum.

A model in Lego of the Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANTA model in Lego of the Cromwell Museum in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANT

The giant Lego replica of the George, which comes complete with figurines to represent the audience, was commissioned by the Shakespeare at The George (SaTG) theatre company, which celebrates its 60th anniversary this year.

Measuring 6ft x 4ft x 3ft, the finished masterpiece took Mike two months to build and he used approximately 250,000 individual Lego bricks, including 200 Lego figurines to represent the audience, cast and crew.

The model will occupy pride of place at the George Hotel, in George Street, from the start of May through to the end of SaTG's summer production of A Midsummer Night's Dream, which runs from June 25-July 6.

The Cromwell Museum has a model of the building as it would have been when it was the town's grammar school and Oliver Cromwell was a schoolboy.

A Lego model of Shakespeare at the George, in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANTA Lego model of Shakespeare at the George, in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANT

The model recreates what the building might have looked like 400 years ago, when the main museum gallery would have been a classroom for about 20 local boys who were studying Greek and Latin to prepare them for university. At that time there was an upper floor inside the building which would have been the schoolmaster's apartment.

In recent years, Mike has made everything from a Victorian doll's house to a life-sized Dalek, often to support local charity shops around the Christmas period. Last year Mike made an enormous model of a civil war siege for the museum.

Stuart Orme, curator of the Cromwell Museum, said: "Mike's one of our volunteers, and has created this very detailed and quite accurate model of what our building looked like in the early 1600s when Oliver Cromwell and Samuel Pepys were pupils here. It's been split into two halves so people can see inside and see how complete it is to the last detail - even down to the Lego quill pens on the desks."

Mr Addis said he learnt a lot about the old buildings of Huntingdon through the construction process.

A Lego model of Shakespeare at the George, in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANTA Lego model of Shakespeare at the George, in Huntingdon. Picture: ARCHANT

He said: "I have a much better appreciation of the process and have to say I am quite impressed with builders now."

The Shakespeare at The George model took him two months to complete, while the museum, which he described a "more complex" was about four weeks.

"The museum was technical as it is in two parts, but The George posed a challenge due to the sheer size," he said.

Mike is currently working on a Roman mansion for the Porch Museum in Godmanchester.