The death of a motorcyclist in a collision near Old Hurst last year could have resulted from “a lack of experience” an inquest heard.

Christopher Harvey, of Fisher Terrace, Ramsey, was killed after his Sinnis XF125GY motorcycle left the C119, just south east of its junction with the St Ives Road on September 24 last year.

The 43-year-old was travelling from Ramsey when he lost control of his motorbike after negotiating a series of bends.

In a statement, witness Peter Matson De-Laurier said: “I could see the motorcyclist fighting to keep the wheel of the bike from coming out from underneath him.”

An inquest held at Lawrence Court in Huntingdon on Thursday (February 11) heard that Mr Harvey's motorcycle careered to the opposite side of the road and struck the ditch of the field which caused him to be thrown off the vehicle.

“He then leaped into the air and landed in the field on my side a few feet from where he was thrown,” added Mr Matson De-Laurier.

Senior coroner for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough David Heming was told that Mr Harvey had only passed his basic motorcycle training in 2014.

Matthew Harvey, brother of Christopher, a ward auxiliary, said: “A couple of weeks after Christopher passed his test he was involved in an accident which knocked his confidence for a little bit.”

However Mr Harvey added that his brother often used his motorcycle to visit family in Leicester and travel to and from work, and was planning to get a bigger bike in the coming months.

PC Jay Porter, collision investigator for Cambridgeshire police, told the inquest that Mr Harvey had tried to correct his path which caused him to under steer.

He said: “Whilst attempting to correct his path he steered an incorrect course which caused him to leave the carriageway.”

PC Porter added that the road conditions were good on the day of the crash and there was no evidence that Mr Harvey had been travelling to quickly or had been distracted.

However he suggested that Mr Harvey's “relative lack of motorcycle experience may have caused the incident”.

The court heard that Mr Harvey was taken to Addenbrooke's Hospital, in Cambridge, but confirmed dead later that day of traumatic injuries sustained in the accident.

Mr Heming expressed his condolences to the family and friends of Mr Harvey and concluded that his death was accidental.