A JURY will retire this morning (Friday) to consider its verdict in the trial of two men charged in relation to a doorstep shooting in Godmanchester.

A JURY will retire this morning (Friday) to consider its verdict in the trial of two men charged in relation to a doorstep shooting in Godmanchester.

Adam Jordan, a 41-year-old man who was dog-sitting for the owner of the house, was shot in the incident, which happened in June of last year in Anderson Crescent, Godmanchester.

Harry Beddoes, 24, of Wellingborough is charged with conspiracy to possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life and a lesser charge, conspiracy to possession of a firearm with intent to cause fear of violence. He denies both charges.

Martin Hunt, 57, of Earls Barton, Northamptonshire, is charged with the same counts, and also denies both.

On Monday, Travis Pratt, 29, of Earls Barton pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life, unlawful wounding and aggravated burglary.

Hunt yesterday finished giving evidence to Peterborough Crown Court, where he said he had driven his friend Pratt and Beddoes, who was to become his son-in-law four days after the shooting, to the address in Godmanchester as a favour because Pratt's car had been “playing up”.

Hunt claims that Pratt told him he needed to see someone in Godmanchester to settle a debt, and that Hunt did not know that a shotgun would be involved.

Hunt said he knew Pratt was involved in the escort business and that Pratt wanted to confront a man at the Anderson Crescent address over his treatment of the escorts and allegations he had been “roughing them up”.

Judge Nic Madge asked Hunt: “Did you think whether any force would be needed recover money from a man like that?”

Hunt replied: “I did question Travis about it, and he said: 'The worst thing that could happen is that maybe I give the fella a slap'.”

Giving evidence earlier in the week, Beddoes told the court that he had accompanied Pratt on the trip “to add numbers” in the case of confrontation, but that he had been shocked when Pratt produced a shotgun.

When Mr Jordan opened the front door to Beddoes and Pratt, there was a scuffle, the gun went off and both defendants fled to the car, where Hunt was waiting.

In his closing speech, prosecutor Hugh Vass explained that the charge against Pratt, Hunt and Beddoes was one of joint enterprise.

Reminding the jury of Pratt and Hunt's “long-standing and genuine friendship”, Mr Vass said: “Why would Travis Pratt fail to mention to his old mate what he was getting involved in?”

He said it was unlikely that Pratt and Beddoes would not have considered how they would react to confrontation at the Anderson Crescent property.

“Harry Beddoes clearly needed to know that Travis Pratt had a loaded shotgun,” added Mr Vass.

This morning, Judge Madge will make his final summing-up this morning, before sending the jury to consider their verdict.