Hemingford Abbots launched 'fantastic scheme' during pandemic

The bridge at Hemingford Abbots has an interesting history.

The bridge at Hemingford Abbots has an interesting history. - Credit: HUNTS POST

Hemingford Abbots  is a busy village with a social club and a pub and it is full of community spirit.   

Chairman of Hemingford Abbots Parish Council, Marcus Whewell, described some of the ways the community pulled together throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Marcus said: “A restaurateur who does a series of pop-up restaurants in the village hall, decided at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic to introduce a food delivery service. 

“People would order their food and then the organisers would bring lovely fresh food to people's house every Wednesday or Thursday. This could be bought for a moderate price and that would be for people who didn’t want to go out to the shops, it was a fantastic scheme. 

“In the pandemic, people all kept an eye on each other and offered help to one another.” 


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The Hemingford Hub oversees Hemingford Grey and Hemingford Abbotts and this also played a vital part in the Covid-19 pandemic.  

Tish Peek, chairman of The Hub said: “The Hub was already set up before the pandemic as a good neighbourhood scheme, but then suddenly Covid arrived and we then had to get our skates on and run fast.”  

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“We quickly recruited a lot of volunteers, more than 100, and we divided the village into zones, a zone was a few streets and each zone has its own set of volunteers."  

free 24-hour library, known as the Swap Box.  

A telephone box also stands in the village filled with books serving as a free 24-hour library, known as the Swap Box. - Credit: Archant

An old red telephone box also stands in the village and it is filled with books serving as a free 24-hour library, known as the Swap Box.  

Its inauguration took place on World Book Day on March 1, 2012.  

Cambridgeshire County Councillor Ian Bates came along to officially open the venture and Andrew and Edward Baily did the honour of cutting the ribbon.  

The Village Hall committee funded the project and it was organised by Pearl Muspratt and Polly Harper. 

Niels Payne, 51

Niels Payne, 51, was working from home when workmen alerted him that they had found a bomb in his back garden. - Credit: Archant

Last year in September, a villager discovered a WWII bomb in his back garden, which later had to be disposed in a nearby field.   

Niels Payne, 51, was working from home when workmen alerted him that they had found a bomb.   

Niels said: “They had only been working an hour with a digger, when I got a tap on the window and they said you won’t believe what we have just found.”

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