WHEN an urban fox tires of the hustle and bustle of the city, where better to retire to than a quiet corner of Lord de Ramsey’s Abbots Ripton estate?

WHEN an urban fox tires of the hustle and bustle of the city, where better to retire to than a quiet corner of Lord de Ramsey's Abbots Ripton estate?

This striking straw sculpture, which has been on display outside London's Royal Festival Hall, has become the first installation at a new "sculpture garden" being launched in 2012 by the team behind the Secret Garden Party.

Secret Arts - the new arm of the festival - is encouraging applications from artists keen to be a part of the project, and turn the site into a home for art all year round.

The 25ft-high fox was constructed by Pirate Technics, the firm behind the artistic centrepieces that are traditionally burned on the Saturday night of the festival, after the Southbank Centre saw their work at the Secret Garden Party.

Made from thatching straw woven into a solid frame, the Urban Fox was created to celebrate 60 years of the first Festival of Britain, and is the first Pirate Technics piece not to have been burned.

Artistic curator Tess Acheson said it would remain in Huntingdonshire "for the foreseeable future", but would need regular maintenance to get it through a wet winter.

The festival has always put interactive art at its core, with 2011 featuring giant floating islands, tunnelled labyrinths and flocked trees, and the move to becoming a permanent venue will allow many more artists to exhibit their work.

Artists seeking to contribute to the festival - whether through performance, installations, art boats or theatre - can apply for grant funding through the website at www.secretgardenparty.com