Fancy becoming lord of the manor? Huntingdonshire titles are put up for sale

The ancient Domesday Book.

The ancient Domesday Book. - Credit: Archant

Two lordships in Huntingdonshire have been put up for sale, with one including a registered village green.

The manors of Eynesbury and Alconbury – which both appear in the Domesday Book

- are available to buy from Manorial Auctioneers, and the titles appearing on the new owners’ passports, cheques and credit cards.

Offers for the Alconbury plot have been placed in the region of £6,750, while it’s expected the Eynesbury lordship will fetch about £8,750 as it includes the nearby village green.

Originally owned by Rohias, wife of Richard de Clare, the Eynesbury manor is listed as having seven ploughs in the Domesday Book, as well as mention of a mill, fishery, and meadow.


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Some eight miles south-east of Kimbolton, about 1,200 people are recorded as living in Eynesbury just before the Second World War, with general stores, a butcher’s shop and a fishmongers.

One chimney sweep, three pubs, and even a parchment and vellum maker were also listed.

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Another manor in Eynesbury was also noted in 1086, belonging to Countess Judith with land for 28 ploughs.

The lordship of Alconbury also holds a rich history, listed in the Domesday Book as having 10 “hides taxable” and land for 20 ploughs.

Since then, it has belonged to Simon de Montfort and Stephen de Segrave, who knew Henry III.

The lordships are also being sold with manorial papers, detailing their extensive histories.

For more information about the lordships and their sale, call Robert Smith on 020 7582 1588.

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