A Hartford man who died from a rare form of cancer believes he contracted the disease because there was “little thought for health and safety” in the industry in which he worked.

A Hartford man who died from a rare form of cancer believes he contracted the disease because there was "little thought for health and safety" in the industry in which he worked.

Hugh Goodchild, of Burnett Way, in Hartford, died after developing mesothelioma, which he believes he contracted after prolonged exposure to asbestos.

An inquest held at Lawrence Court, Huntingdon, on Wednesday (May 4), heard that the 65-year-old worked as a motor mechanic from the 1960s until the late 80s.

The inquest heard that, during that time, Mr Goodchild believes he was exposed to asbestos dust through replacing brakes and other parts on thousands of vehicles that contained the substance.

In the months before his death, Mr Goodchild provided a statement to HMRC regarding his work history.

Read out by assistant coroner for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Belinda Cheney, he said: "My working environment was generally dusty, dirty and industrial. There was little thought for health and safety at this time and no protection was given just wearing overalls.

"In the mid 80s when parts stated to be asbestos free on the box until that time breaks contained asbestos, I and others were not before as it was a natural way to work."

In his statement Mr Goodchild also noted that when he moved onto to be a receptionist for a number of garages there were not robust procedures to get rid of the asbestos dust and he would still inhale the substance.

The 65-year-old was diagnosed with mesothelioma in June last year and was admitted to Hinchingbrooke Hospital in March with breathing and mobility problems after it was found that the treatment for the disease was not working. He died at the hospital on March 6.

Coroner Mrs Cheney concluded that Mr Goodchild died of an industrial disease.