A plaque marking the St Neots birthplace of Battle of Britain hero Victor Ekins was unveiled on September 15.

St Neots man Victor Ekins served as a pilot in World War Two.St Neots man Victor Ekins served as a pilot in World War Two.

This year marked the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, an event that proved to be a huge turning point during the Second World War, and St Neots man, Victor Ekins, was an RAF pilot who went on to work as a land agent.

Members of the Ekins family, along with David Duker, from The Tally Ho Project, unveiled the plaque in Victor’s honour at 28 New Street, in St Neots, - the house where Victor was born on April 16, 1914.

There was also an event at the St Neots Museum, which allowed members of the public to find out more about Victor and his family history.

“It was a fantastic day at St Neots Museum, made all the more special by the fact that both of Victor’s sons and his god-daughter were in attendance,” said David.

The display at St Neots Museum to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain.The display at St Neots Museum to mark the 80th anniversary of the Battle of Britain.

“It was so heartening to see the community come together and pay their respects to a real local hero. Squadron Leader Victor Ekins MBE DFC was one of life’s true gents but he was also one of a select band of pilots who flew and fought for our freedom in 1940. Let’s always remember their story, and be proud of the fact that one of our nation’s ‘few’ was a son of St Neots.”

The Tally Ho Project is based on the Second World War - and in particular the efforts of the RAF during the Battle of Britain - and is taken into schools and other organisations as a learning tool.

Squadron Leader Victor Ekins joined the Volunteer Reserve as a pilot at the outbreak of war.

He served with the battle-hardened 501 Squadron and on September 27, 1940, after months of hard fighting, 501 Squadron were set upon by 20 German Bf110s and Victor’s Hurricane was attacked.

His aircraft was badly shot up and he was seriously wounded. Incredibly, a bullet had passed through his body before smashing into the controls of the Hurricane, bringing it down.

He was back in the firing line with 501 Squadron within just eight weeks.

In June 1942 he was awarded The Distinguished Flying Cross.