Councillors in Huntingdon have raised concerns about plans for a new supermarket which they say looks like “a warehouse”.

Huntingdon Town Council members made the remarks at a meeting held last week after viewing a planning application submitted to Huntingdonshire District Council on behalf of Aldi.

It was reported in The Hunts Post last month that the discount chain was looking to take up position as the fifth supermarket in the town by building on Edison Bell Way, a site formerly owned by Tesco's development arm Spen Hill.

Mayor of Huntingdon, councillor Bill Hensley, said: "It is dreadful, it looked like a warehouse. The site needs to be nicely surrounded with nature otherwise we are going to have more and more buildings."

The proposed development is set to be a multi-million pound investment in Huntingdon that will aim to provide the town with a modern and sustainable food store.

However it was agreed that as there are no current developments on the road that Aldi did not need to incorporate its plan to be in keeping.

Deputy mayor of Huntingdon, Daryl Brown, told The Hunts Post: "There are concerns around the look of the supermarket but my personal view is as there is no existing street scene anyway, therefor Aldi doesn't need to merge in with other buildings."

Despite the look of the proposed supermarket, at a meeting of the town council's planning committee on Thursday (November 19) it was noted that the store would bring greater competition to Huntingdon.

"I think competition is a good thing, having an Aldi and a Lidl will achieve great things for the town and it is certainly good for businesses," added Cllr Brown.

The planning application is currently in the consultation stage which allows for councillors and Huntingdon residents to have their say.

If planning permission is granted to the value supermarket chain it is likely that the store will be open in Autumn 2016 and will provide the town with around 50 jobs, according to an Aldi spokesman.

The spokesman added: "It will be an accessible local supermarket which will serve Huntingdon town centre and help clawback the convenience trade."