Where’s logic?

HAVING recently taken part in the BBC s survey to determine Britain s top iconic design, I began to wonder what, for me, typically defined the British people. The results of the recent pro-celebrity competitions started me thinking I might be on the trac

HAVING recently taken part in the BBC's survey to determine Britain's top iconic design, I began to wonder what, for me, typically defined the British people. The results of the recent pro-celebrity competitions started me thinking I might be on the track of resolving this issue.

First there was Strictly Come Dancing, won thanks to the viewers' votes by Darren Gough, who was clearly not the best dancer, but was a member of England's Ashes winning cricket team.

Then there was Dancing on Ice, during which the viewers'votes ensured that the favourite, and in the opinion of the judges the best ice dancer, didn't even make the final.

Finally there was Just the Two of Us, and in this case the viewers' votes made sure that the only singer with talent finished second to a competitor whose singing could at best be described as flat and toneless.

Is eccentricity/illogical voting behaviour the definition that I am looking for? And, if it is, can it be developed to enhance the 2012 Olympics? I think I have the answer to the latter question.

Obviously I will have to discuss my proposal with Lord Coe, but the plan is this. Using the technology of digital television, every British viewer will be issued with a red button to press after the completion of each event. In the case of the 100 metres, for example, each viewer will press the button immediately after all the competitors have passed the finishing line and then vote for the "real winner".

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This will ensure that any athletes crossing the line first who are deemed to have an unfair advantage, such as too much natural ability, will be excluded from the results - the winner being selected from those competitors having little or no ability, or who tried hard but suffered as a result of having poor training facilities.

Will your readers vote for my scheme? If my theory is correct, they obviously will.

JOHN E HICKMAN, Bramley Avenue, Needingworth

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