TRIBUTES have been paid to a 10-year-old boy who tragically died just months after he was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. Charlie Buckley was described as always smiling, caring and polite beyond his age. More than 1,000 people went to Charlie s f

TRIBUTES have been paid to a 10-year-old boy who tragically died just months after he was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia.

Charlie Buckley was described as always smiling, caring and polite beyond his age.

More than 1,000 people went to Charlie's funeral at St Mary's Parish Church in St Neots on Friday.

Roads had to be closed as hundreds of walkers and the procession of vintage lorries and cars made their way through the town.

Charlie, who died on October 17, was diagnosed with leukaemia in April. His seven-year-old brother, Mosey, was a bone marrow match, but despite four courses of chemotherapy, Charlie died before his condition was right for the transplant. He also leaves brother, Alfie, five.

Floral tributes representing every aspect of his life were created for Charlie who was a pupil at St Mary's Church of England Primary School.

There is a sea of flowers at St Neots Cemetery, in the shape of Charlie's boxing gloves, his dog, and his horse Lucky, which had belonged to him all his life and drew him to his funeral.

Mum, Caroline Buckley, who lives with her family on the travellers' site in Cambridge Street, told The Hunts Post: "I haven't come to grips with what has happened.

"Last night, I woke up and I was looking for him. You can't see a way forward really. I just feel numb."

She said Charlie was brave throughout his treatment.

"He cried when he was told he would lose his hair but that was it - no matter how ill the treatment made him. He never moaned."

Mary Barnard headteacher at St Mary's said: "We have a book of condolence at the school and everybody, to a man, has written that they will miss his smile. You would walk into the classroom and his eyes would be twinkling.

"He had been here since nursery so he was an enormous part of our school. Nobody has been left untouched by his death and there has been a pouring out of love and caring.

"A lot of parents have donated blood, people realised how much it was needed. Charlie had 30 blood transfusions and 70 transfusions of platelets."

To raise money for leukaemia research, a sponsored penalty shoot-out at the school has been planned for Friday and a celebration of Charlie's life on Wednesday, December 2.

Nurse Heidi Clark, who works at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge where Charlie was treated for six months, wrote a card to his parents, Caroline and Moses, saying: "He had a big heart and he loved his family to bits. He is the bravest 10-year-old I know."

INFORMATION: Already over £1,000 has been donated in Charlie's memory to Leukaemia Research and Addenbrooke's Charities for Ward C2, the children's cancer ward. Donations can still be sent to funeral directors, TL Cobbold, 11/13 New Street, St Neots, Cambs PE19 1AE.