Three-hour wait for terminal cancer patient after hospital lost notes

A CANCER patient who has just months to live has criticised the NHS after being asked to attend Hinchingbrooke Hospital only to find out that his notes had been lost. Elias Elgar, 64, from Colne, who has cancer of the bowel and the liver, told The Hunts

A CANCER patient who has just months to live has criticised the NHS after being asked to attend Hinchingbrooke Hospital only to find out that his notes had been lost.

Elias Elgar, 64, from Colne, who has cancer of the bowel and the liver, told The Hunts Post he wasted three hours at the hospital and left without being seen.

"I have been told I only have eight or nine months to live, so I don't want to spend what's left to me waiting for phantom appointments," he said.

Mr Elgar said he received a letter asking him to take a urine sample to the treatment centre at the hospital.

"The appointment was for 2.45pm. I can't drive so a neighbour drove me the 18 miles to the hospital and we arrived there at 10 past one.

"I waited until 3pm and then someone came and told me they were sorry for the delay but they didn't know why I was there because they had lost my referral notes.

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"Then the woman who spoke to me went off duty. There was no explanation."

He added: "The appointment might have been something to do with the gal stones I have but no one seemed to know. At 4pm, my lift came for me, so I left."

Mr Elgar who was diagnosed with cancer in October and has regular treatment at the hospital's Woodlands Centre, took up the matter with the hospital's patient liaison and advice service (Pals).

"Someone from Pals contacted me with an apology from the hospital and they have given me another appointment for Friday.

"Apparently my notes were there but no one knew where."

A spokesman for Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust said: "Clearly there was a breakdown in communication in the case of this patient, which is regrettable.

"The trust's staff found a consultant to see this patient, but unfortunately the patient had left before he could be seen.

"However, after the patient contacted Pals this issue has now reached a resolution.

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