Sister to the rescue

I READ with interest your article about Primrose Lane hospital (July 11). It was already a maternity hospital in the 1950s. I was born there in July 1956 and my mother remembers her stay there well. Shortly after I was born, she found that the tap wate

I READ with interest your article about Primrose Lane hospital (July 11).

It was already a maternity hospital in the 1950s. I was born there in July 1956 and my mother remembers her stay there well.

Shortly after I was born, she found that the tap water was scolding hot - from both the hot and the cold taps. She reported this to a nurse, who found that a damper on the heating boiler was jammed open, making the boiler burn at full power and too hot to approach. The caretaker said he didn't want to go near it anyway, as it was about to blow up.

Matron, on hearing this, marched round singing O Valiant Hearts at the top of her voice to keep up the spirits of the young women on the ward. A brave lady? Not really - she marched round outside the hospital, not wanting to be blown up with the occupants, passing by the open window next to my mother's bed.

Fortunately for us who were inside the hospital, one of the sisters displayed more practicality than the matron and more resourcefulness than the caretaker. She braved the heat and managed to force the damper shut using a pole.

BRIAN KING, Bedford

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* I HAVE lived in Primrose Lane (The Hunts Post, July 11) since I was born, and I have seen many changes to the buildings.

I agree that the bricks should be saved, but they should stay on or near the site, not up the High Street.

Mrs B DARLING, Primrose Lane, Huntingdon

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