Review: Supergrass at Cambridge Junction

SUPERGRASS open the night with the first tracks from their new album. Diamond Hoo Ha Man has more than a touch of The White Stripes about it – a deep, fuzzy, bluesy riff sets the pace for Gaz Coombe s nonchalant rock vocals. Like so many of their tracks –

SUPERGRASS open the night with the first tracks from their new album.

Diamond Hoo Ha Man has more than a touch of The White Stripes about it - a deep, fuzzy, bluesy riff sets the pace for Gaz Coombe's nonchalant rock vocals. Like so many of their tracks - it's fun, but seriously good.

For a time, I was worried that the unfamiliar new material might dampen the night, but it's all so soulful that its essence comes across at first listen. The new tunes are mixed perfectly with the older favourites. There are at least two sides to Supergrass.

On one hand they can sound extremely down to earth, like a very slick pub band. Slick perhaps doesn't do them justice - more like the undisputed heavyweight pub band champions of the world. But it's classic sounding and comes from something ordinary.


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Then, sometimes they turn and show a side of themselves that is really sublime and inspired.

Richard III is perhaps their most inventive fast track and it hasn't lost its magic in the decade since its release.

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The recent addition of Charly Coombes on guitar and occasional percussion fills out the stage their sound brilliantly.

His presence changes the feel of the band on stage for the better - but it's more than just numbers. It's great to know the band aren't content with just getting by and are open to new ideas.

CHRIS BOLAND

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