REVIEW: Dirty Pretty Things, Hot Club de Paris and Larrkin Love

@ Cambridge Corn Exchange, December 1 AFTER their sell out performance at The Junction in May, Dirty Pretty Things at the Cambridge Corn Exchange was one of the winter s most hotly anticipated gigs. There were fantastic support sets from both Hot Club de

@ Cambridge Corn Exchange, December 1

AFTER their sell out performance at The Junction in May, Dirty Pretty Things at the Cambridge Corn Exchange was one of the winter's most hotly anticipated gigs. There were fantastic support sets from both Hot Club de Paris, whose Futureheads-like sound obviously struck a chord with the crowd and elfin-beauties Larrkin Love. They played a fantastic set, inspiring a sing-a-long to their biggest hit from the album The Freedom Spark, Edwould. Larrikin Love sound fresh and original, in an age where identikit bands are becoming the norm.

Dirty Pretty Things finally took to the stage, every inch the rock 'n' roll saviours. The contrast to the May performance was incredible - tonight's band were cohesive and confident, obviously much more happy in each other's company this time around.

They trawled through the songs from their latest album Waterloo to Anywhere, effortlessly and looked surprised at the reaction the songs were getting. Also on the set list, In the City, a Jam classic, which singer Carl Barât had convinced Paul Weller to play for the first time in 25 years just weeks earlier as part of the BBC electric proms.


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My personal highlights were the inclusion of a new song, How can they be bored of England? - the first ever live performance, as well as the old Libertines' track, The Good Old Days, the heart wrenching tenderness of the ballad France and the final song of a spectacular encore, I Get Along.

It seems that Carl Barât has finally set the ghosts of his past to rest. The Dirty Pretty Things look much more comfortable, like they're genuinely enjoying what they're doing.

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Every song was mind-blowing. They seem to be one of the few modern bands that command complete adoration from their fans, and this was certainly present in Cambridge.

AMY HODKINSON

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