Review: Dirty Pretty Things @ Cambridge Junction

IT S an exciting time for fans when a prominent group splits and its members fragment to form a variety of new acts. Almost like a rock science experiment we get to see the different elements of that band and what they can do alone. Since indie heroes Th

IT'S an exciting time for fans when a prominent group splits and its members fragment to form a variety of new acts.

Almost like a rock science experiment we get to see the different elements of that band and what they can do alone.

Since indie heroes The Libertines disbanded, we first saw efforts from bassist John Hassell in the form of Yeti, but the greatest expectation has been on the shoulders of the band's creative forces - Pete Doherty's Babyshambles and Carl Barat's Dirty Pretty Things.

Monday's sellout show at the Junction certainly ticked most of the boxes that any fan could have wished for.


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It was clear these guys were intent on resurrecting the lost art of looking like a band. In their uniform tight black jeans and jackets, they strutted around the stage, perfectly living up to their name.

Their sound is naturally reminiscent of The Libertines - with Barat's vocals, guitar and fellow former Libertine Gary Powell on drums this is to be expected. But more than that, their style carries the flame of their old band much more than Babyshambles. They have powerful, punchy guitar work, riffs that thread themselves through their tracks and slurry melodies that could well evaporate in a bigger venue.

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For much of the show they failed to entice me, despite being in awe of the fever they were creating amongst most of the crowd. However, halfway through the set, the music seemed to take more liberties with their familiar winning formula and added some slight, but much needed variety.

It's certainly fun stuff, but while Pete Doherty's music tugs at the heart strings and mind, Dirty Pretty Things go straight for your dancing feet.

CHRIS BOLAND

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