Review: David Gray at the Corn Exchange

FOR the final night of a long greatest hits tour, tonight s show could have sounded like a jukebox performance of his most obvious songs, but I guess that s just not his style. He starts with the sparse sounds of early song Shine and a brooding yet rousin

FOR the final night of a long greatest hits tour, tonight's show could have sounded like a jukebox performance of his most obvious songs, but I guess that's just not his style. He starts with the sparse sounds of early song Shine and a brooding yet rousing acoustic version of Babylon.

He plays with loops and echoes of his voice and many tracks are given a very different treatment from the record. Twice he breaks into passages of Dylan songs at the dying moments of a track, but it's Springsteen I feel he is often closer to in sound and feel. This is especially so with You're The World To Me and The One I Love. However, there's little that yells rock and roll here tonight.

Gray rarely strays from a faithful blend of folk rock and alternative rock. Visually he seems to characterise the former - a busker clutching an acoustic guitar, swaying in time to his own music. His sound though is much more ethereal than the suited guy on stage might indicate. From Here You Can Almost See The Sea marries both of these sides wonderfully and is extraordinarily delicate, as is an epic version of Nightblindness in the encore. Overall, it's world-class stuff - classic songwriting given an inspiring, subtle sonic twist.


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