ABOUT 400 animal rights protesters marched peacefully through Huntingdon on Saturday. It was the first time in four years that the protestors have been allowed in Huntingdon to demonstrate against animal testing at Huntingdon Life Sciences. Cambridgeshir

DRESSED UP: A young protestor makes her point dressed as a dog.

ABOUT 400 animal rights protesters marched peacefully through Huntingdon on Saturday.

It was the first time in four years that the protestors have been allowed in Huntingdon to demonstrate against animal testing at Huntingdon Life Sciences.

Cambridgeshire police said Saturday's march was peaceful and no arrests were made.

However, according to leaflets handed out by protestors another demonstration is already being planned for Huntingdon on Saturday, December 8.

OPERATION: Officers from Cambridgeshire police keep an eye on the demonstration.

This has been planned as a protest and candlelit vigil to mark international animal rights day.

The flyers said that the protesters would assemble at Riverside car park at 6pm.

There had been concern before Saturday's march that the protest would affect trade on a busy Saturday in the run-up to Christmas.

However, hundreds of shoppers turned up in town early so that they could do their shopping and leave before the marchers appeared.

After the walk through the town, the demonstrators from Shac (Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty) went to the site of Huntingdon Life Sciences at Woolley.

Huntingdon's town centre manager, Katy Sismore, said: "I think the march was very well organised by the police but I think it was unfortunate that the protesters were allowed to march any time between 11am and 2pm.

"Press releases were issued which led people to believe they intended to march at 11am or 11.30am and they didn't end up marching until 1.30pm.

"Any march will have an impact on trade but they do have the option to march."

She added: "It gave people something else to worry about. I will be looking at the time, route and date of the other marches to make sure they have as little impact on Huntingdon traders as possible."

Chief Inspector Darren Alderson said Saturday's police operation had been successful.

"A number of officers were involved to ensure minimal disruption to the public and protect the safety of those involved," he said. "There were some minor delays in Huntingdon and in the Alconbury and Great Stukeley areas as protesters travelled to and from the Woolley site.