How to catch a killer

MATCHING fibres was crucial in the conviction of Ian Huntley for the murders of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman in August 2002 and Roy Whiting for the murder of Sarah Payne in August 2000. Scientists took 14 months examining tens of thousands of fibres fo

MATCHING fibres was crucial in the conviction of Ian Huntley for the murders of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman in August 2002 and Roy Whiting for the murder of Sarah Payne in August 2000.

Scientists took 14 months examining tens of thousands of fibres found at Huntley's home and car. These were eventually linked with fibres from Holly and Jessica's Manchester United shirts. They were made of wool and four types of polyester fibre, which was unusual in sporting garments. The carpet from Huntley's house and car was blue corded and made up of five colours. The link was made between fibres from the shirts on the carpet and fibres from the carpet on the shirts.

Forensic work in the Sarah Payne case took 17 months. Whiting was found guilty after evidence of fibres and a single hair with Sarah's DNA were found in his van. Whiting was already on the sex offender's register. Some 500 items were submitted for forensic analysis. Over 20 forensic experts were employed. Sarah's DNA profile was obtained from a milk tooth which had been saved by her mother.


You may also want to watch:


Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus