Forensic evidence persuades man to change plea to guilty

A SAWTRY man could not believe he was just over the drink-drive limit because of the amount he had drunk before driving his car, his solicitor told Huntingdonshire magistrates. But forensic scientists said that what he had drunk between driving and being

A SAWTRY man could not believe he was just over the drink-drive limit because of the amount he had drunk before driving his car, his solicitor told Huntingdonshire magistrates.

But forensic scientists said that what he had drunk between driving and being breathalysed would not have affected the reading.

Robert Hubbard, 45, formerly of Bruce Close, Conington, and now living in a caravan in Sawtry following the breakdown of his marriage, had initially denied driving with excess alcohol but had changed his plea to guilty because he could not prove the scientists were wrong, solicitor Kevin Warboys told the court.

"He has always insisted that he consumed alcohol after ceasing to drive. But forensic scientists said it did not account for the excess. Mr Hubbard is still unable to understand how that could be, but we have no expert evidence to refute that view," Mr Warboys explained.


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He said Hubbard, who is involved with community and charity work in Sawtry, had already lost one job as a driver, and his main work installing and maintaining security equipment in banks and building societies throught the country could be at risk if he were unable to undertake jobs to which colleagues could not drive him.

A test showed his blood-alcohol level to be 85 milligrammes per 100 millilitres, compared with the legal limit of 80. He was banned from driving for the statutory minimum of 12 months, fined £100 and ordered to pay £100 prosecution costs. He will be entitled to have his licence back three months sooner if he successfully completes a drink-drive rehabilitation course before September.

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