Fencing carp

FIRST thoughts on the erection of a stock fence to encircle Monks Pit at Rectory Farm seemed to me a costly and unnecessary expenditure, the usual use of such fencing being to prevent straying stock animals, usually horned or hoofed, from incurring damagi

FIRST thoughts on the erection of a stock fence to encircle Monks Pit at Rectory Farm seemed to me a costly and unnecessary expenditure, the usual use of such fencing being to prevent straying stock animals, usually horned or hoofed, from incurring damaging legal claims. Since in this case the stock within the encircled lake are after all sub-aqua resident carp, why bother?

However, in this age of political correctness and health-and-safety-induced thinking, was I missing the message? In this age of a child-bearing male, genetic engineering, GM crops, sprays of chemicals, inter-reactions, notwithstanding global warming, one could charitably, possibly, envisage a joined mutation of a foot and winged species developing, lurching in the depths. We are, after all, aware of flying fish, though of course, they are a salt water species. Then again the lake is obviously too short for a carp to get airborne.

One could imagine the news media's frenzied headlines - Stroller Slapped by Stampeding Shoat of Fat Flat-Footed Fish. I jest, but remember Darwin.

So the erection was for our benefit and protection? Do you still believe in Father Christmas, fairies, leprechauns and elves?


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PAT DOHERTY

Kisby Avenue

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Godmanchester

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