FA ruling makes no sense

I MANAGE a local under-12 team and have coached them from U8. I find it quite ridiculous that the FA is pursuing this non-competitive stand with youth football. Yes, winning is not everything, and teams should learn to take the losses with the wins. The w

I MANAGE a local under-12 team and have coached them from U8. I find it quite ridiculous that the FA is pursuing this non-competitive stand with youth football.

Yes, winning is not everything, and teams should learn to take the losses with the wins. The whole ethos of sport is to have fun, while participating in exercise, learning discipline and developing personally. The concept of competition encourages development, encourages discipline and an attitude to trying hard.

Winning is the reward for effort, whether individual or team, and they deserve the recognition. If the FA is that worried that competition and recognition stifle development, why doesn't it take away the goals? That would solve the problem of one team scoring more than another, and who needs goals in life?

Everything the kids will do in life is a competition of one form or another, wanting to better themselves, be top of the class, be a winner in a chosen sport.

I would fully support The Hunts Post in continuing to publish results, as this is what the kids involved in the game want, winning teams or losing teams. There is no shame in being beaten by a better team, and wanting to win should be encouraged. Perhaps we should do away with exams or at least stop giving out results so as not to disappoint students.

Has the FA considered that any kids who are afraid of losing or would feel shamed by published results and tables are unlikely to be playing the game in the first place? There are different sports/hobbies for everyone, and for kids who dislike direct competition, there are plenty of other opportunities and interests.

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Local gymnast Lewis Smith and local footballer Darren Bent, both from young ages dedicated themselves to being the best that they could be and, rightly so, got the recognition that they deserved from young ages. What if the desire to compete had been removed from them?

Every top athlete and achiever tells you that they worked harder, trained harder and wanted to win more that the competition. Why set an age limit on this determination?

Quick question: Is this the same Football Association that's responsible for the success of our national team, that's now trying to take out the competition in our youth football?

RICHARD NOBLE

Manager

Godmanchester Rovers U12A Colts

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