MORE memories of The Hunts Post Bunny Fellowship – and Uncle Bunny – have reached us. A rare memento, which has been treasured for more than 64 years by of one of the children who became famed nationally as the St Neots Quads, has come to light. Ann Brown

A Bunny medal

MORE memories of The Hunts Post Bunny Fellowship - and Uncle Bunny - have reached us.

A rare memento, which has been treasured for more than 64 years by of one of the children who became famed nationally as the St Neots Quads, has come to light.

Ann Browning still has the silver medallion given to her and her brothers in 1939 when they raised £7 6s 3d. (just over £7. 30). This would have been something like three weeks' wages for a working person. At the time, the quads were aged four.

Mrs Browning, who now lives in Sandy, said: "I think father was earning only £3 a week when we were born."

The medallion is inscribed as having been presented to the quads and their brother Gordon, who was a year and 10 months when they were born.

Mrs Browning said: "Whenever we were given a present, Gordon was to have one, too, or we weren't allowed to have it.

"The medallion has been in mother's button box for years."

Ann is the oldest of the quads. Her brothers, Ernest, Paul and Michael were born after her. She said: "Mother told me she said to herself when I was born, well I've got one daughter, I don't mind what the others are."

Mrs Browning said she had forgotten all about the medallion until her brother Michael, visiting the family from South Africa where he lives, had read memories of the fellowship this month in The Hunts Post.

She said: "It was in mother's button box. I've cleaned it up and I thought I could make it into a necklace."

The quads, who marked their 70th birthday in November, were born at home, two months early. Paul lives in Cambridge, Ernest in Oxford, and Gordon lives in Poole, Dorset. They are now all grandparents.

Meanwhile, a reader brought in copies of Uncle Bunny's column from the 1930s. The Bunny Fellowship, which ran from the 1920s to the 1960s, was a young readers' club which collected pennies for the children's ward at Huntingdon's County Hospital.

Originally, they were asked to collect "bun pennies" with Queen Victoria's head on them with her hair in a bun.

A reporter known as Uncle Bunny visited the hospital interviewing young patients each week for his column. There were fellowship competitions and reports of how the young bunnies raised the cash.

A page in the 1930s describes "the thrilling rescue" of goldfish, which were found in water in an empty house and were taken to the safety of the children's ward.

The same edition noted that 558 pennies had been collect that week (about £2 and 32p) and that a little girl called Audrey Farminer had raised £1 8s 9d (about £1.43).

A membership coupon had the postal address: Uncle Bunny, Hunts Post Office, Huntingdon. On it was the promise: "I pledge myself to show good fellowship towards everybody so that the Bunny Fellowship may be honoured wherever it is known.