Baby choked on fruit

A BABY boy from near St Neots choked to death on a piece of apple less than two months before the same tragedy took the life of 10-month-old Georgia Hollick. An inquest in Huntingdon on Thursday heard how 14-month-old John Lee from High Street, Toseland,

A BABY boy from near St Neots choked to death on a piece of apple less than two months before the same tragedy took the life of 10-month-old Georgia Hollick.

An inquest in Huntingdon on Thursday heard how 14-month-old John Lee from High Street, Toseland, tragically died at Hinchingbrooke Hospital on February 23.

He had choked on a small piece of fruit given to him by his mother.

The inquest heard how John's mother, Amanda Williams, had taken him into the garden of their home for some fresh air after he started choking. When the fresh air didn't relieve the problem, he was then taken to Hinchingbrooke Hospital, but sadly died.

A post mortem examination showed John had died from asphyxia due to upper airway obstruction caused by what was thought to be a small piece of apple.

Giving evidence at the inquest, Pc Adrian Boddington from Huntingdon police station said: "There were no signs of injury or malnutrition and there were no suspicious circumstances surrounding John's death."

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In recording his verdict of accidental death, coroner David Morris, said: "This was an utter tragedy".

Ten-month-old Georgia Hollick died after choking on a piece of apple at the Just Learning Nursery in Cambourne on April 19.

Investigations into Georgia's death are still being carried out by Ofsted and South Cambridgeshire District Council.

n Dr James French who has worked for Magpas for three years and has been a doctor for six years says the best thing to do when a child is choking is to call 999.

"Parents shouldn't panic when they realise a child is choking. You should summon help straight away by phoning 999.

"If the child is old enough to understand you then you should encourage them to cough and ask them to remain calm.

"If the child is unable to cough, too young to understand you or still choking then you should give the child five backslaps. When giving the backslaps you should make sure the child is secure by either putting the child across your shoulder or on your knee or by supporting them on your forearm.

"If this does not clear the child's airways then a qualified paramedic should administer chest thrusts on the child.

"If you want to find out how to administer chest thrusts then St John Ambulance can teach the whole procedure of what to do when a child starts choking."

INFORMATION: To find out more about the courses offered by St John Ambulance phone 01223 355334 or visit www.sja.org.uk

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