A woman from Huntingdonshire, now living in Uganda, is urging you to donate money for disabled children living in Africa, where she says disabled children are hidden. Teresha Clark, 27, is one of the founder volunteers of the Spring of Hope project, whic

Ugandan teenager Bosco

A woman from Huntingdonshire, now living in Uganda, is urging you to donate money for disabled children living in Africa, where she says disabled children are hidden. Teresha Clark, 27, is one of the founder volunteers of the Spring of Hope project, which aims to help disabled children in rural communities in Uganda. "I thrive on the whole experience," said Teresha. "I love what I do and to make a difference to a child's life and know that I have had a part to play is the most enormous privilege ever. "I first went to Uganda on a year out in 2001 and asked the question why I didn't see any children with disabilities," said Teresha, a former pupil at Hinchingbrooke School. "There is such a stigma attached to children with disabilities that they are physically abused and there is no support for their families." Teresha returned to Uganda and set up the Spring of Hope project in 2004, and has since run monthly physiotherapy clinics, supported children to have corrective surgery and obtained specialist equipment such as wheelchairs in addition to building relationships with families. One boy who has benefited greatly from Teresha's work is 17-year-old Bosco, who was born with a deformity which meant that he could not walk, so he manouvered his way about on his knees right up until the start of 2005. However, help from The Spring of Hope Project has enabled to Bosco to walk properly and Teresha commented that when she visits him and his family, he is often hard to find, such is the extent of his new found independence. Another example is eight-year-old Prosy, who has hydrocephalus (fluid on the brain). After years of lying on the a mat, Spring of Hope managed to help her sit up with the help of regular physiotherapy, despite a specialist hospital saying that nothing could be done. However, funds are urgently needed if the good work that Teresha and her team have begun is to continue and flourish.Spring of Hope volunteers currently travel by rented motorbike, and are looking to buy two for the organisation, costing around £800 each. However, Teresha was keen to emphasise how far a little money would stretch in Uganda. "Although we need money for the motorbikes, just £10 will provide calipers to help children to walk, while £20 will provide a special chair for a child."INFORMATION: If you would like to donate money to the Spring of Hope, please make cheques payable to YWAM Uganda, and send them to 66 Windmill Close, Ellington, Huntingdon, PE28 OAJ.The Spring of Hope project is part of Youth With a Mission, the international, voluntary interdenominational Christian Organisation, operating in 140 countries across the world.