Abbey’s habits are improving

ABBEY College, in Ramsey, is satisfactory and improving, according to inspectors from Ofsted. The school, a specialist technology college, was formed in September 2006 by merging Ailwyn School for pupils aged 11 to 14 and Ramsey Abbey, which included a si

ABBEY College, in Ramsey, is satisfactory and improving, according to inspectors from Ofsted.

The school, a specialist technology college, was formed in September 2006 by merging Ailwyn School for pupils aged 11 to 14 and Ramsey Abbey, which included a sixth form.

The report notes that the merger followed moderate achievement in the two predecessor schools and there have been improvements this year.

It says most pupils are polite, friendly and well-behaved. They contribute to the community through charities, voluntary activity and school councils.


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However, it adds that achievement is graded satisfactory because pupils have not made up for earlier gaps in their learning.

The report says teaching is satisfactory and improving. "The college makes accurate assessments of teaching quality which shows that lessons are rarely inadequate, but not enough are good or outstanding."

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It says the curriculum allows nearly all pupils to gain at least five A* to G graded GCSEs but provides a limited range of 14-19 vocational course options.

"Technology college status has brought several benefits. Learning support is well organised and all students receive satisfactory guidance and care."

The report says that grades in most AS level subjects were average or above and grades at A2 were average or below. About half the Year 11 students went on to the sixth form, fewer than in comparable schools.

However, it adds that sixth formers were confident, communicated well and made valuable contributions to the running of the school.

"Their personal development and well-being are satisfactory. Sixth formers' support helps Year Seven newcomers settle into the college and improve their reading skills.

"Links with the community include visits to elderly people and support for charities. Care, support and guidance are satisfactory but students do not learn enough about the diversity of beliefs and cultures."

The inspectors said the new head of sixth form had had a considerable impact, monitoring students' progress and having a range of strategies to extend and support learning.

To improve the school further, the report says standards and achievement should be raised, especially for the most able pupils, by improving the quality of teaching.

It also calls for improvement in behaviour for the minority of disruptive pupils, for increased vocational courses for pupils aged 14 upwards and for better communication with parents, especially responding to contacts parents make with the school.

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