A walk in the wood

IN the past Brampton Parish Council has campaigned commendably for the preservation of the countryside, Brampton Wood being one such endeavour. However, 15 years on, their stance on conservation seems to have wavered. One of the proposals they intend to

IN the past Brampton Parish Council has campaigned commendably for the preservation of the countryside, Brampton Wood being one such endeavour. However, 15 years on, their stance on conservation seems to have wavered.

One of the proposals they intend to put to the Highways Agency regarding the A1 Ellington to Fen Ditton southern bypass favours the Brown route. Why? I do not doubt their sincerity but seriously question the consequences of this.

Firstly this route cuts Wood Lane in two and creates a nasty diagonal gash across the pristine landscape between Brampton Wood and the A1. The road, aligned on a higher elevation, would become visible from the village, with possible increase in noise and pollution, carried by the prevailing wind .

The large triangle of land encapsulated by the Brown route, the existing A14 and the A1 and easily accessed from the BP garage complex, could be vulnerable to large scale commercial development .

Roads are built for all. We depend on them in many ways. Therefore we should be prepared to suffer some of the consequences and ensure they are routed for the greater good.

I urge all parish councillors to take a walk down Wood Lane, behold the view and vow to its preservation for people on foot, cycle or horseback. And back the Orange route.

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WAYNE FENDLEY, Bassenthwaite, Huntingdon

* THE letter from Nita Tinn, chairman of the Offords A14 Action Group (January 17) cannot be allowed to go unchallenged on a number of issues.

The thinking behind the assertion that Brampton, Huntingdon and most of Godmanchester would be the same or better off with the northern route is difficult to comprehend. How is moving the route closer to these places going to make them better off?

Again, although the southern route would require a slightly longer viaduct, why is this part of the Ouse Valley any more deserving of protection than that further north?

Pollution, a very important consideration, was not even mentioned in the letter. The prevailing wind would carry traffic fumes away from the Offords whichever route is chosen. However, it is obvious that Godmanchester, being downwind and very close, would be badly affected in this respect by the northern route.

The southern route (the Orange Route in the Highways Agency's consultation document) must be the fairest for all.

It is a fact of life that vociferous minority pressure groups can have a disproportionate effect on decision making. The consultation period ends on March 9. It is crucial that everyone with an interest makes their views known to the Highways Agency.

MICHAEL DOVE, The Maltings, Godmanchester

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